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Book ends

The other day, I was talking to a friend about why I prefer romance (though I read in many genres). As always, the HEA came up. I won’t get into that too much here because I’ve covered it in previous posts. The important thing to know about me as a reader is that if I’m

Putting it all on the line

I’ve been stuck in revision mode for the past week or so, kind of stymied by how to go at my plot changes. I was brainstorming–my husband was nice enough to point out a gaping plot hole on the way back from the boys’ swim meet at Auburn on Sunday–and trying to talk to my

A kick in the pants

If you’ve been keeping up with my posts the last few weeks or months, you’re probably starting to think I’m schizophrenic. One minute I’m lauding the wonder of structure and pre-planning, and the next I’m lamenting the missing magic when I write within a structure. Basically, you’ve been watching me try to find myself. I

The missing ingredient

Most of my story ideas come from a tiny spark: a single scene, a premise that interests me, or an intriguing character. That spark is the all-important beginning to a story, but it’s not nearly enough to build an 80,000-word book. It’s no secret to my long-time blog readers that I struggle with plotting. By

Down to the studs

I once got to work on a charity building project where we took the man’s house down to the studs and built it back up again. (Ha! I know which kind of studs you were thinking of!) Well, today I did that with a movie, but without the build up, or the drywall dust. See,

Taking a shortcut

A few months ago I read a good writing book called Plot & Structure by James Scott Bell. In it, Bell advocates going through six books and writing a note card for every scene to describe its POV, location, type of scene, and purpose. Then when you’re done (six months later), you periodically pull out

Structural integrity

I just finished Story Structure Demystified by Larry Brooks, and I think it’s the book I’ve been looking for all along. We’ve discussed “pantsing” vs. “plotting” here several times before, but the best thing about Larry’s book is that it gives you a structure to hang your work on, regardless of how you write. There