Join my newsletter for freebies and info on upcoming books, classes, appearances, and discounts.Join Now!
banner image

Happy Thanksgiving

In honor of the holiday, here’s an acrostic representing some of the things I’m thankful for in my life.

T – Time to write and work on the things that are important in my life

H – Husband who is the love of my life and my best friend

A – Air Force lifestyle that lets us live all over the country and feed our need for travel

N – New writing friends who have taught me so much and been an incredible source of support

K – Kids: two boys who grow more caring, intelligent, and handsome every year

S – Stories that come to me when I least expect them

This day wouldn’t be complete if I didn’t thank all of my family for their love and support, and friends old and new for being so great.

Happy Thanksgiving, everyone!

Cult of personality

Have you ever met a person who rubbed you the wrong way, but you couldn’t figure out why? Have you ever had a boss or coworker you didn’t know how to deal with? Did you ever wonder how two siblings raised by the same parents could be so different (like my own boys)?

It’s all in the personality.

Understanding your personality style can be valuable for determining career choices and understanding why you act the way you do. Recognizing others’ personality styles can help you get along better with the people you deal with every day.

But as a writer, you can use an understanding of personality styles to craft complex characters who act in a consistent and believable way. Besides knowing your character’s goals and motivation, choosing a personality style for her will help you create a believable reaction when she meets an obstacle.

Using The Platinum Rule™ Behavioral Styles developed by Dr. Tony Alessandra, here are four potential responses for your character when she’s faced with an obstacle:

  • The Thinker might gather information, make a list of pros and cons, and plan a response, finally acting when she has as much information as possible. Her response will probably be timely, but not immediate.
  • The Socializer would probably make a decision based on impulse. Leap then look.
  • The Relater would worry about the problem, try to avoid it, ask for other’s opinions, and hope that someone else would take care of it. Head in the sand.
  • The Director would quickly size up the options, make a decision, and execute it, even if others think it’s the wrong choice.

It should be clear that the type of character you choose can have a great effect on your story. Each of the four options above could take the same story in a different direction.

If you’d like to find out more, here are some of the popular personality assessments you might want to check out. Take a quiz as yourself, and then take a quiz as your character. You might be surprised what you learn.

The Daily Squirrel: acrobat

In her dreams, she was an acrobat, flying high above the circus floor while the audience looked on with awe. The gasps of the crowd filled her ears, the wind ruffled her hair and cooled her face as she flew from swing to swing. She could smell the popcorn and cotton candy mingled with the scent of hay and animals. With a sudden bang on her bedroom door, the dream vanished, slipping through her fingers like sand. She stared at the loose drywall tape on the ceiling of her ordinary bedroom, in an ordinary house, where her boring, ordinary life took place.

The written word…without Word

You’re probably intimately familiar with some sort of word processing software, especially if you’re a writer. But, while Microsoft Word and similar programs are great for formatting a finished manuscript, business letters, and other documents, they may not be the best software for writing a story.

There are several programs out there for writers, and there’s a good reason for it. Traditional word processors force you to write linearly, or cobble together multiple documents if you don’t.  Good writing software can free you to write in the way that works best for you.

At a friend’s suggestion, I tried Scrivener (UPDATE 1/13/11: Which now has a Windows version in the works) and ended up buying it well before the free trial ended. Each writing project is organized as a collection of files, all accessible from the same screen, much like being in Finder (or Windows Explorer).

I can write a scene–or an outline of a scene–when inspiration strikes, and save it for later (see Unused Scenes below). I can easily move scenes around, create scene cards for them, search for terms across all scenes, search by keywords, keep project and scene notes, import research documents and web sites, and so much more. I don’t know how I ever lived without it!

I use the Resources section to hold links to research web sites, a file where I keep track of my daily productivity, a character list, photos of places or character inspirations, character questionnaires, and most important of all, a folder called Unused Scenes, where I store cut scenes to scavenge for useful bits, and potential future scenes.

For those who are easily distracted, Scrivener even offers a full screen mode. And, in the end, you can export the whole project to Word, or another program, either fully formatted, or ready to format.

If you’re serious about writing, consider switching to software that works with your writing style, not against it.

The main writing screen…


Resources Section…


Happy Writing! (No Daily Squirrel today, this post is already long enough…)
[tweetmeme source=”yourtwittername” only_single=false]

Need more help? Sign up for an online class, check out Scrivener For Dummies, read more Scrivener articles, or ask me about private training.

 

 

 

 


Like this article?

tea mug and chocolate barIt takes a lot of mint green tea and dark chocolate to fuel these posts. If you found something helpful, please consider a small donation to my pantry. Thank you!

$

(enter desired amount)

Select Payment Method
Personal Info

Donation Total: $3

An idea whose time has come

My ideas usually come not at my desk writing, but in the midst of living.  ~Anais Nin

People often ask writers where their ideas come from. I even find myself wondering the same thing after I read a great book. The answers? Everywhere, nowhere, hard work.

We get them from things we see in our daily lives, that is, everywhere. Places we go, people we meet, new stories, and personal experiences all have the power to generate the seed of an idea. Many authors become intrigued by the “what if?” and pursue that until they have a story.

But, they can also come out of nowhere. For example, I often think of storyline bits, or plot ideas right after I wake up in the morning. I’m not actively trying to work on anything, it just comes. I keep a pen and paper by my bed for this reason, because if I don’t write it down, I’ll surely lose it.

Sometimes, a writer just has to work at it. There are all sorts of techniques for generating new ideas. I even wrote about one of Einstein’s creativity methods for the Southern Magic blog a while back.

For me, often the key is to give myself permission to let the ideas flow. I sometimes have this sense that ideas are waiting for me if I would just stop whatever I’m doing and let them out. At those times, I sit down with plenty of paper, and start taking notes.

No matter how a writer generates ideas, the real trick is to put in the time, day after day, writing them down. Some will turn into a story, some won’t, but all the best ideas in the world won’t make you a writer if you don’t put fingers to keyboard and write.

The Daily Squirrel: nose

Amelie stared at her nose in the mirror. The purple bruising had turned more green and yellow over the last few days, but at least the swelling had gone down. She touched it gently and winced. Stupid John and his flailing racquet. That ball had been hers. She knew one thing for sure: she was never going to play doubles tennis again.

Harlequin: Surely, you jest

Harlequin Enterprises, one of the most well-known and respected names in romance publishing, caused quite a furor a few days ago with its announcement of a self-publishing venture, Harlequin Horizons.

This has authors and agents ranting about predatory practices toward uninformed wannabes, and tarnishing the Harlequin brand for its paid authors. For great level-headed coverage and an explanation of the whole ordeal, check out the pubrants blog.

My inbox has been overflowing with emails from the author loops I’m on, with every reaction from mild disappointment to downright fear. Especially since RWA and the Mystery Writers of America both revoked Harlequin’s status as a legitimate publisher.

Right now, the situation is still fluid, and I’m guessing that in a few weeks–when the emotions aren’t running so high–everyone’s questions will be answered, and some sort of compromise will be reached that satisfies both sides.

In the latest round, Harlequin has decided to remove its name from the venture, but the conflict of interest still exists, so the controversy isn’t over yet.

I’m not in the Chicken Little camp, but I’m not ready to let Harlequin off the hook, either.

The Daily Squirrel: Arizona

It was hot. The scorched, dry air stole her breath as she stepped out of the air-conditioned building onto the soft asphalt of the parking lot. Immediately, sweat trickled down her back and beaded on her nose. Her legs felt baked as if she were standing next to an open oven door. It might be a dry heat, but it didn’t matter. Dry or not, it was stinkin’ hot.

Writing Pageantry

My baby, Counting on You, is finally on its way to Texas to be judged against everyone else’s baby in the most prestigious pageant for unpublished romance authors, The Golden Heart. (Insert huge sigh of relief here.)

Frankly, my chances of making it to the finals are slim. Almost 1000 writers entered last year, and no more than eight from each category will make it to the finals. But, the attempt is worth it. While there’s no guarantee a finalist will garner a publisher’s attention, chances are very good.

A writer who makes it to the final round (or wins!) can feel confident that her work is competitive among some of the best unpublished romance authors out there. Granted, the judging is subjective. Preliminary judges are other authors, both published and unpublished. But, the whole industry is subjective.

Writing contests are like the current spate of talent shows on TV…um, except not on TV. Most people won’t make it to the top 20. Some will confirm they royally suck, others will learn that they’re good but need more work, and a few will realize their dream.

Of course–like everyone else–I’m hoping to realize my dream, but until then, I’ll just keep pounding the keys.

The Daily Squirrel: green (one of my favorite colors)

The color green screamed so loud from the walls and furnishings of the tiny room that her eyes hurt. She could almost feel the weight of it on her shoulders. Green had always been her favorite. The color of the forest, the jungle, a field of grass. But this…this was too much, even for her.

One No closer to Yes

I got my first rejection letter–well, email–today. The worst kind: a form letter with no personalization at all. Well, now I’ve lived through that. As the positive thinking experts would say, “I’m one ‘no’ closer to ‘yes’.”

I actually thought I’d be more upset, but I think my many months of conditioning through reading RWA articles and listening to my chapter mates helped me go into this with realistic expectations. The odds of getting a request from an agent aren’t very good. I’ve read enough agent blogs to know that it depends on my query letter, timing, luck, the agent’s mood, what’s on the agent’s desk right now, whether Scorpio is rising…

All I can do is hope for some personal feedback at some point, and keep honing and sending that letter. And most important of all, keep writing! I’m almost halfway through my current project, so if I don’t get requests for Counting on You, maybe Floater will fare better.

I’m not a big believer in fate, or superstition, but I’ve had enough experience to believe that things happen when you’re ready for them. Maybe I need to write a few more books before I’m ready. But, I’m also not giving up. I sent out more than one letter.

Maybe the next agent will read my query during a full moon and be struck with the urgent need to see a complete manuscript. Could happen.

The Daily Squirrel: rejection? 😉

She spread the thick, rough paper flat on the table, smoothing the creases with her warm palms. Everything she’d ever done had led to this moment, and she squeezed her eyes shut, afraid to look, knowing that one paragraph, one sentence…one word, would change her life forever.