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My first podcast appearance

Today marks my first time on a podcast. It’s with the crazy bunch of guys from the Self Publishing Podcast, and we’re basically gushing about Scrivener the whole time. It was fun!

I’d love to hear what you thought, or what you love about Scrivener that I didn’t get to mention.

Image credit: http://www.kde-look.org/content/show.php?content=14788 via Wikimedia Commons.

0 Comments

  1. Frank Bird

    Reply

    I love Scrivener and have used it cross platform from Windows to Linux using Dropbox as a versioning file system.

    I have also recently fallen completely in love with KDE Linux. Unfortunately this is not a match made in heaven and all my attempts to run Scrivener under KDE come to naught due to a conflict of QT libraries.

    Someone will hopefully come up with an answer.

    Regards
    Frank

    • Reply

      Frank: I’ve never used Linux, but I hope you get things figured out. (I assume you’ve already talked to the folks at L&L about this.) Scrivener’s too awesome for a writer to live without! 😉 Thanks for stopping by.

  2. Frank Bird

    Reply

    In fairness Gwen the guys over at L&L have released Scrivener as a Beta on Linux and I have been using it in that guise for a year as well as paying for it on my Windows machine(s).

    Although I might get flamed for this, Linux is (still) not for the faint hearted but is particularly usefull for that older machine or Laptop; being lighter and carrying far less Bloatware or overhead.

    Perhaps as importantly it offers a viable alternative to the Apple or MS products.

    Both those companies have a vested interest in polarising both the public’s, and more dangerously our children’s, views on IT.

    [ softly falls the footsteps as he quietly descends from his soapbox ]

    🙂

    Frank

    • Reply

      No flaming here, Frank! That’s definitely a positive side to Linux, and I think it’s great that L&L goes out of their way to accommodate users on as many platforms as possible.

      I’m a recent (last five years) Mac convert, and after years of Windows updates with increasing overhead, I was impressed that one of my Mac OS upgrades was actually smaller than the previous version. But you’re right. Both Apple and Microsoft are out for themselves in the end. It’ll be interesting to see who becomes the disruptive force now that Apple is mainstream.

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